September 23, 2020

DD4By KELSEY HEELEY

Join the fight against cancer by wearing a daffodil pin to show your support.

Throughout April, which is daffodil month, volunteers will be working to raise funds for the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS). According to www.cancer.ca, every three minutes cancer affects another Canadian in some way.

According to www.cancer.ca, there are four ways you can show your support. The first is to make a donation and wear a daffodil pin. The second is to make a donation when a volunteer knocks on your door. The third is to spend a few hours and volunteer your own time to get donations and the last way is to simply spread the word.

But, how do you get a daffodil pin?

All you have to do is go to one of the generous pin partners and make a donation. They include the LCBO, Running Room, Pharmasave, LifeLabs, Tbooth, Wireless Wave, Jacob, Laura, Sobeys, CAA, Napa Auto Parts, Development Bank of Canada, Cogeco, Canlan Ice Sports and Golf Canada.

You can also go to www.fightback.ca

 to find which retail stores in your area are pin partners.

You can wear a pin on your coat or wear one online. Go to www.fightback.ca and get a daffodil added to your profile picture on Twitter or Facebook.

While all of April is daffodil month, there is also daffodil day, which is April 27. This is a special day when Canadians show their support for those who live with cancer and remember those who have died from the disease.

On this day, the CCS tries to encourage Canadians to do something nice or contribute in some way to the fight against cancer.

As an example, you could tell a loved one or a friend with cancer that you are thinking of them. You could also let them know about support programs and share information.

Tony McLellan, a first-year print journalism student, said his family has a history of cancer. In almost every generation, someone has had some form of cancer. He said it is something he has to be concerned about in the future.

“Cancer took away my Grandma Donna Martin before I could get the chance to get to know her. I was five years old when she died. That’s why I hate it,” McLellan said.