September 25, 2020

BY NATALEIGH MCCALLUM

Something as simple as having the door held open for you can put an instant smile on your face. If this random act of kindness is done by a complete stranger, it’s even better.nmrak3

Conestoga students experienced this during the seventh annual Random Act of Kindness Day on Nov. 7. RAK Day, as it has come to be known, was created by the Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation (KWCF) in 2008 to encourage citizens to perform small acts of kindness and generosity. The initiative is now celebrated across the country.

A number of booths were set up all over the campus encouraging random acts of kindness. There were free hot beverages, candy and cards saying things like “I appreciate you” and “I respect you” that students could give to friends. There was even a booth where students could wear a funny hat and mask and have their photo taken while holding a white board on which was written a random act of kindness someone did for them.

“I think Random Act of Kindness Day means a more relaxed school environment because ideally everyone would be focused on the needs of others rather than themselves,” said Jordan Bajar, a second-year registered practical nursing student.

Laura Black, Student Life programmer and the co-ordinator of the event, said it is the little acts of kindness that can really make the world of difference to someone.

“Random Act of Kindness Day is really important to Conestoga College. It’s really about building community and it’s about bringing everyone together,” Black said.

Students just had mid-terms, winter is starting to hit and all of the stress is starting to compile, so reminding students that kindness really does make a difference is important.

But should there be only a day dedicated to random acts of kindness? Should it not be an everyday occurrence?

“I like to think that this (the annual event) is just a reminder, that this is a day we focus on it but really we’re doing it every day in our lives,” Black said.

And that’s exactly the purpose of the event, to do something kind and not expect anything in return other than they do something nice for someone else.

“It’s the fact that everyone decides to be nice for one day, even though they should be doing it every day. It is one day of recognizing each other’s kindness,” said Natasha Bolden, a second-year fitness and health student.

So even though RAK Day has come and gone, hold a door open for someone, offer to grab someone a coffee or even just smile. It truly does make a difference.

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