November 19, 2018

OPINION BY MELODIE LARIVIERE

I was born in pretty much the middle of the millennial era. I remember when I was growing up, everyone, not just your elders, were treated with nothing but respect. Paying attention to someone was instinct; a smile was a daily expression that I gave to everyone no matter what. Speaking out of turn rarely occurred. Today, however, there is such a lack of respect. The number of times my teachers have to stop teaching to tell us to pay attention is unbelievable.melodie

I’m 20 years old. I was raised to say please and thank you when someone does something to help me. I was raised to hold the door open when there’s someone coming in behind me, hold the elevator, to speak when spoken to and to pay attention to someone who takes time out of his or her day to better my education.

In elementary school I was surrounded by other kids like me. We were polite, sweet and caring. However, these same kids have grown into people I do not recognize. They are hormone-filled devils.

When it became too much for me I began to distance myself from them and began to find new friends.

As I’ve grown up and gone through middle school, high school and now almost a year and a half of college, I’ve noticed one thing that just confuses me to no end.

As time went on my peers began to either pay attention to their friend or their cellphones or computers in the classroom. The teachers and lectures were placed at the back of their minds, while texting and whispering have become more entertaining. I’ve seen students use class time as nap time. Though I admit to partaking in these acts, there are also times and places where they begin to be disrespectful.

Teachers have always been some of my favourite people. There is always a few classes I love going to because of the teacher. It’s not just who they are, it’s their teaching styles and how they interact and include us as the learners.

But I’m an exception. Many students have lost respect for the teachers. They don’t come to class, talk during lectures or play online, miss handing in assignments and then demand an extension, etc., etc.

I can’t help but sometimes feel bad for the teachers. They come prepared with lessons so students can learn. I understand it’s their job but at the same time the more you pay attention in class the better you’ll do. Instead of having to ask your classmates what you missed, you’d know and have the details to succeed.

It always surprises me that it is the students who aren’t respectful who complain that they aren’t getting any respect.

 

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